Lebanon Valley Indoor Classic Tractor Expo - Page 2
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  1. #11
    Senior Member Maine Willy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BFVSFOREVER View Post
    I love the narrow front tractors, 222 and 444, I learned to drive on a Farmall H, it was a great tractor. Do I hear some New England interest in a Plow Days event? I am all for it and when I talked to Chris this afternoon we talked about the big farms on Conn Rt 49 up by the fairgrounds in North Stonington. I know Jared is interested also.
    I would definitely be interested!! Willy

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  3. #12
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    Since guys like me can only dream of attending these,, thank you for posting the pictures and info. I like seeing the pics.

    Here's a really dumb question,, I see a couple of the trike gear on the front,, (narrow steering wheels together) What exactly is the attraction to doing that? Looks sort of unstable that way,,

  4. #13
    Site Supporter bknight187's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lionel View Post
    Since guys like me can only dream of attending these,, thank you for posting the pictures and info. I like seeing the pics.

    Here's a really dumb question,, I see a couple of the trike gear on the front,, (narrow steering wheels together) What exactly is the attraction to doing that? Looks sort of unstable that way,,

    I believe it is just for show. You are making a "mini" version of the older 1940 and 1950 tractors. I have seen the JD guys turn a 318 GT in a "mini" model A narrow front end. Has become popular in the garden tractor shows on the east coast

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  6. #14
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    So, I've been talking to some older gents that have been around farming for certainly longer then I have.

    They indicate, the desire to have those 2 front wheels close up together like the above pictures,, was for turning capability.

    For plowing, at the end of the row and to comeback on your row. I'm told, they virtually turn on a dime. With that configuration, I can somewhat understand that, as it would seem to make sense,

  7. #15
    Senior Member Caseman2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lionel View Post
    So, I've been talking to some older gents that have been around farming for certainly longer then I have.

    They indicate, the desire to have those 2 front wheels close up together like the above pictures,, was for turning capability.

    For plowing, at the end of the row and to comeback on your row. I'm told, they virtually turn on a dime. With that configuration, I can somewhat understand that, as it would seem to make sense,
    Most likely memmories - people used this style in "the days" or still do.

    It is different and cool in its own way and remember that these are mostly for show.

  8. #16
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    For plowing the narrow front is not ideal, as you have to steer continuously as you can't drop one wheel in the furrow and steer against the wall. Cultivating on the other hand, they really excelled! Straddled 2 rows no matter what the crop as you could set the rear wheels really wide if need be and when turning the outside rear wheel tended to track in the path of the front wheels so less tramping. As far as being tippy, they are more stable than they look as most of the weight is on the back axle and since the front axle on a wide front tractor occillates under the frame by the time it reaches the end of it's travel you are already in deep s#$%. Mount a loader on a narrow front end tractor though, you better keep a spare set of shorts in the tool box.

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