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  1. #11
    Senior Member ssmewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.Fure View Post
    What works for one yard may not work for another. Before you spread lime on your lawn you should take some soil samples of soil to an agronomist to have the soil PH tested.

    http://lawnfertilizers.com/info/lime-sulphur.html
    Home PH testing is very easy and cheap. A home center will have kits.

    You are very right though on applying lime. The lawn needs a certain PH and lime will change it.

    There are online instructions for testing it. Some say to treat the various sections of the lawn the same by combining all your samples into one jar, and others say to test each section.

    IMHO if you have moles in some sections but not others, test those sections just to see if you can apply lime there. You can end up needing 100's of pounds of lime.

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  3. #12
    Tractor Whisper gator_rider2's Avatar
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    Milky spores is product need spread it comes in powder and granular forum you need put out before August grubs eat grass root and grow next cycle changes bugs, most common may beetles, june bugs and Japanese beetles. Taking out grubs moles move on and away no food source.

  4. #13
    Senior Member L.Fure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssmewing View Post
    Home PH testing is very easy and cheap. A home center will have kits.

    You are very right though on applying lime. The lawn needs a certain PH and lime will change it.

    There are online instructions for testing it. Some say to treat the various sections of the lawn the same by combining all your samples into one jar, and others say to test each section.

    IMHO if you have moles in some sections but not others, test those sections just to see if you can apply lime there. You can end up needing 100's of pounds of lime.
    If a yard, or garden, does need lime it takes a year or two to work its way into the soil to do any good. I have found that barn lime works the best for this kind of application. You can buy white barn lime at any feed mill. The crushed lime you buy from an agronomist takes a little longer to work into the soil if it is only surface applied. The barn lime is finer and will work into the soil faster, but you still need to wait a while for it to work. As an example of how much lime you might need, I had tested my field for PH and content of micronutrients in the soil. The test reported that I had to apply 12 tons/acre of lime. That sounded like a lot, so I had 6 tons/acre applied. A few years latter I tested the PH again. This time it called for 6 tons/acre. 6 tons on an acre of ground made it look like a sand box. If you need to apply large amounts of lime to your yard it would be best to apply it every other year until it is all applied. Otherwise you'll ware your blades down to a nub mowing through the lime.

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  7. #14
    Senior Member ing3018's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenblood44 View Post
    Any one use the agrifab spreaders from tsc (Agri-Fab 130 lb. Tow Broadcast Spreader)? Or if you know of any good ones please share the info. I am going to war with the ground moles after this growing season and beat them into submission.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    I have used a tow behind but found it too hard to control (on-off and turning) for fertilizing. I prefer a walk behind rotary spreader. Mine is an Earthway brand. Get one with large tires.

    I borrowed a tow behind when I put my lawn in years ago. My soil was too alkaline and so I had to add 900 pounds of sulfur to get it into balance. For that job, I was glad for the tow behind!

    Perhaps a 3-point mounted one with an electric motor (or hydraulic!) powered spinner would be easier to use than a tow model.

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  9. #15
    Super Moderator tss8690's Avatar
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    Not a broadcast spreader but I've been eyeing one of these:

    https://www.gandy.net/42-variable-ra...ader-tow-hitch

    Pretty expensive as spreaders go but every time I look at one of the big box store tow-behind drop or broadcast spreaders, they just look cheap.

  10. #16
    Tractor Whisper gator_rider2's Avatar
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    This Broadcast spreader that think fits our tractors and all types material to spread fire ant material very small like mustard seed.

    Herd Spreader link for attracting spreader to Case or Ingersoll and others. Herd GT-77-ATV Broadcast Seeder/Spreader. you do search find many suppliers.

    http://www.beavervalleysupply.com/sectionb/herd.htm

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    Maine Willy (06-16-2017),Quartercase (06-16-2017),tss8690 (06-16-2017)

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