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  1. #21
    Senior Member Seabee's Avatar
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    Not going to say Diacamba with those pictures. It could still be, or maybe 2,4,D. Certainly a good case for Herbicide drift of some kind. Most will drift with enough wind.

    Bill

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  3. #22
    Member MrMoe's Avatar
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    2 4 d

    [QUOTE=Seabee;738401] or maybe 2,4,D.

    Thanks for the response. Our son in law is a soybean researcher he also thinks 2 4 D.
    We were so excited to finally get a place in the country. We are becoming worried that what we have is a place in a toxic wasteland. Glad to hear that Dicamba will be becoming less of a problem. I have been stomping walnuts, acorns and chestnuts along the borders with cropland. Already getting some saplings. I hope to create a barrier. Is there a chance that that would help?
    Maurice

  4. #23
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    Update. I worked on the garden today and the damage is not too bad. Our plantings are limited but we enjoyed our first tomatoes this week. I rode my bicycle home and stooped for a lengthy chin wag with the neighbors, fellow Case fans (theirs has 8 wheels and the tires are 8 feet tall X 3 feet wide, it has 650 horse power). It was confirmed that the beans across the road are Dcamba beans. They do not know what they will do next year. I suggested Hay. We talked about things like what is all the protesting about to how handsome and intelligent my nephews are and how much they inherit from their Nigerian dad. Hoping for Hay and peace in America.
    Maurice and Doreen McMurry
    Last edited by MrMoe; 07-02-2020 at 10:45 PM.

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  6. #24
    Member MrMoe's Avatar
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    Here is another image of the same plants taken today. My son in law suspects disease. It is not a disease I have had a problem with in 40+ years of gardening. I am still hoping for data rather than paranoia. We have another immediate neighbor who is an accomplished gardener his garden looks very poorly this year as well. His day job is with the co-op selling fertilizer and herbicide. I am not sure if should bring up my suspicions. The good news, (or bad) our struggling plants still produce?

    IMG_20200730_122250358_HDR.jpg

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    Senior Member dave1mn2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMoe View Post
    Here is another image of the same plants taken today. My son in law suspects disease. It is not a disease I have had a problem with in 40+ years of gardening. I am still hoping for data rather than paranoia. We have another immediate neighbor who is an accomplished gardener his garden looks very poorly this year as well. His day job is with the co-op selling fertilizer and herbicide. I am not sure if should bring up my suspicions. The good news, (or bad) our struggling plants still produce?

    IMG_20200730_122250358_HDR.jpg
    Here are a couple pages for diagnosing tomato problems.

    Hope you get it figured out.

    http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.corne...Tom_ComDis.htm


    https://njaes.rutgers.edu/fs547/

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  9. #26
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    you could take off all the dead leaves and spray the remaining good leaves with baking soda and water. 1 table spoon per gallon ratio. maybe a drop of soap to help it stick to the leaves.

    This would rule out fungal infection

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    Super Mod dundee222's Avatar
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    Blight. Commmon here. It loves humid/wet weather hence wet leaves to thrive. Clean off all dead leaves and burn them. Do not plant tomatoes in the same area next year. Disease winters in the soil. We have to mulch or plastic on the soil here upon transplanting so that rains do not splash the disease up on the leaves.

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    Senior Member dave1mn2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dundee222 View Post
    Blight. Commmon here. It loves humid/wet weather hence wet leaves to thrive. Clean off all dead leaves and burn them. Do not plant tomatoes in the same area next year. Disease winters in the soil. We have to mulch or plastic on the soil here upon transplanting so that rains do not splash the disease up on the leaves.
    Looks like blight to me too but he said 40 yrs. of gardening experience so ...

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  15. #29
    Member MrMoe's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=dave1mn2;742005]Looks like blight

    Thanks for the articles and advice. The Plants certainly have the symptoms of late Late Blight. We are having a wetter summer than normal here Too. This only our 3rd year gardening at our wee "farm". Pryor to that we have only had a few rows in our back yard in town. The garden spot is in a former soy bean field. My brother, the sheep farmer and forage expert, says not to expect much until I have nursed the soil for a few years. Could the soy beans have added to the danger of blight?
    Thanks and regards, Maurice

  16. #30
    Senior Member dave1mn2's Avatar
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    Soybeans are a legume. All legumes add nitrogen to the soil as a by product, which is why generally, they are grown with, or in rotation with high nitrogen users such as corn. Toms like nitrogen too.

    In companion planting guides, beans and toms get along well.

    Soybeans can suffer from nematodes, as can toms but I don't recall if they are the same nematodes that attack each. Either way, from what I can see in your pic. its not screaming nematode damage to me.

    Your brother may have other insights but unless the soil was damaged by an herbicide, I can't think of any reason why a bean field would be a problem for toms and I doubt that is the problem, because it would have stunted them.

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