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  1. #31
    Senior Member Gordy's Avatar
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    Chances are, that was farmed for a very long time. The soil will be lacking (depleted) in many things needed for healthy/nutritious plant growth. My property according to the deed abstract was farmed for over 100 years. At first, plants grew in my garden, BUT did not thrive There are many good sources for rebuilding the soil, Mother Earth News is one. I tried the composting thing, it's a lot less work just to bury the coffee grinds and kitchen scrap sin the garden. I also let the grass clippings lay in the yard for a few day's to dry, then pick them up to mulch the garden for weed control and to keep the water from evaporating from the soil. Add to this brush sent through my Craftsman 5 HP chipper shredder, and the fall leaves, when dry the lawn mower and vac unit shred them nicely for tilling into the soil. It is said that trees bring up mineral from down deep, and their rotting debris form's top soil over time. I have not tried "Rock Dust" or "Bio-Char" yet but they are on the bucket list.

    One experiment that seems to be working very well is the"Back to Eden garden. It is no till, just keep adding layers of mulch and let it compost in place.

    If your tomatoes suffer from "blossom end rot" add calcium ( dried and crushed egg shells, or crushed ouster shells from the feed store) to the soil when planting.

    All of this can be found on you tube if you need more info


    Gordy

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    MrMoe (08-01-2020)

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  4. #32
    Senior Member dave1mn2's Avatar
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    I'd say Maurice's plants had been thriving. Thick and productive, then something happened. So, I don't think its a nutrient problem. More like disease, or pest.

    Blossom End Rot is indeed a calcium deficiency but brought about by uneven watering, more than an actual shortage. The uneven watering inhibits the plants ability use what is there.

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    MrMoe (08-01-2020)

  6. #33
    Member MrMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave1mn2 View Post
    I'd say Maurice's plants had been thriving. Thick and productive, then something happened. So, I don't think its a nutrient problem. More like disease, or pest.

    Blossom End Rot is indeed a calcium deficiency but brought about by uneven watering, more than an actual shortage. The uneven watering inhibits the plants ability use what is there.
    I do water un-evenly as we only don`t get out to the garden as often as I would like. Also my water source is rain water collected from the tractor shed roof. It is often stinky. Your comments and my reading are reminding me of the importance of careful watering. I need to clean up my act with the watering can!

  7. #34
    Member MrMoe's Avatar
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    I am having a Homer Simpson "DOH" moment. My tomatoes get a lot of road dust accumulation. I have been unable to resist washing it off with stinky rain barrel water... DOH!

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    Senior Member dave1mn2's Avatar
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    "I am having a Homer Simpson "DOH" moment. My tomatoes get a lot of road dust accumulation. I have been unable to resist washing it off with stinky rain barrel water... DOH!"

    I don't know that your water is necessarily bad but heavy mulching and bottom watering only, will reduce a lot of problems with toms.

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  10. #36
    Senior Member Gordy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave1mn2 View Post
    I'd say Maurice's plants had been thriving. Thick and productive, then something happened. So, I don't think its a nutrient problem. More like disease, or pest.
    True, but we don't know the whole story. Chemical fertilizers can give you a great looking plant, and nutrient poor produce.

    I think he nailed the main problem, washing the dust off, wet leaves.

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    MrMoe (08-01-2020)

  12. #37
    Member MrMoe's Avatar
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    I will take this this opportunity to share (brag) about some of my brothers approach to improving over coped land for forage and grazing. He does his version of no till witch is "very shallow till". When he gets access to cropland for grazing He will start by rotovateing the weeds several times during the summer at a depth of 1 inch. He then plants turnips in the late summer followed by rye grass, usually marshal rye grass. He gets winter and spring grazing with no herbicide and the fields are improved with only a year off from being cropped. Another thing he has done is to fly turnip seed over standing corn just before harvest and have grazing in corn stubble over the winter. I have done similar things on a very small scale with buckwheat and oats. Also working on fencing and hope to have sheep or goats or miniature highland cattle some day. Thanks everyone for your contributions, Maurice

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    Gordy (08-01-2020)

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